Publications

Funding permitting, Dr Leanda will always opt for journal articles to be open-access as she believes it is currently the most equitable publishing process. At present, open-access is the only means of allowing tax-payers access to science funded using tax-payer money. Please use the links provided below to view the open-access journal articles. If you would like to access one of the other journal articles that have pay-walls, please contact Dr. Leanda and she will be over-joyed to send you a copy via email.

Mason, L.D. (2018). Living on burrowed time: mygalomorph spiders of Perth city. PhD Thesis, Curtin University. (Open-access).

Mason, L. D., Bateman, B., Miller, B., and Wardell-Johnson, G. (2018). Ashes to ashes: intense fires extinguish populations of urban short-range endemics. Austral Ecology.

Mason, L. D., Bateman, P. W., & Wardell-Johnson, G. W. (2018). The pitfalls of short-range endemism: high vulnerability to ecological and landscape traps. PeerJ, 6, e4715. (Open-access).

Mason, L. D., Wardell-Johnson, G., Luxton, S. J., & Bateman, P. W. (2018). Predators Show Seasonal Predilections for Model Clay Spiders in an Urban Environment. Scientific reports, 8(1), 12444. (Open-access).

Mason, L. D., Wardell-Johnson, G., & Main, B. Y. (2018). The longest-lived spider: mygalomorphs dig deep, and persevere. Pacific Conservation Biology, 24(2), 203-206. (Open-access).

Mason, L. D., Wardell-Johnson, G., & Main, B. Y. (2016). Quality not quantity: conserving species of low mobility and dispersal capacity in south-western Australian urban remnants. Pacific Conservation Biology, 22(1), 37-47.

Mason, L. D., Tomlinson, S., Withers, P. C., & Main, B. Y. (2013). Thermal and hygric physiology of Australian burrowing mygalomorph spiders (Aganippe spp.). Journal of Comparative Physiology B, 183(1), 71-82.

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